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Canada Energy Information

2019 Canada Key Figures

Population: 37.5 million
GDP growth rate: 1.55 %/year
Energy independence: 100%

* at purchasing power parity
Total consumption/GDP:* 86.1 (2015=100)
CO2 Emissions: 15.4 tCO2/capita
Rate of T&D power losses: 13.6%

Canada Related News

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Canada Related Research

Total Energy Consumption

At 8 toe, Canada's per capita energy consumption is among the highest in the world and almost triple the average EU level. Electricity consumption per capita is around 14 500 kWh.

Total energy consumption has been increasing slightly since 2010 (1.3%/year on average at normal climate), reaching 301 Mtoe in 2019.

Together, oil and gas represent more than two thirds of total energy consumption (gas 39%, oil 33% in 2019), followed by hydro (11%), nuclear (8%), coal (5%) and biomass (4%).

Graph: : CONSUMPTION TRENDS BY ENERGY SOURCE (Mtoe)

Interactive Chart Canada Total Energy Consumption

More research: Canada energy report

Crude Oil Production

Oil production (crude, NGL and non-conventional oil) has increased by 64% since 2010 (6%/year) and has almost doubled since 2000 to 268 Mt in 2019. Production has been increasing following the development of non-conventional oil (synthetic oil from oil sands and raw bitumen), which now accounts for 58% of total oil production, and offshore production.

Interactive Chart Canada Crude Oil Production

Oil Products Consumption

The consumption of oil products has decreased since its peak in 2016 to 101 Mt in 2019.

The transport sector is the biggest consumer of oil products (54% in 2019), followed by industry with 21% (including non-energy uses).

Graph: : OIL CONSUMPTION (Mt)

Graph: : PETROLEUM PRODUCTS CONSUMPTION BREAKDOWN BY SECTOR (2019, %)

Interactive Chart Canada Refined Oil Products Production

Natural Gas Consumption

The consumption of natural gas has grown very rapidly since 2016 (6.3%/year) after a slower progression between 2010 and 2016 (1.2%/year). It reached 134 bcm in 2019.

The oil and gas sector, in particular the exploitation of oil sands, is the largest consumer of natural gas with 39%. It is followed by buildings (28%), industry (17%), and power plants (16%).

Graph: : NATURAL GAS CONSUMPTION (bcm)

Graph: : GAS CONSUMPTION BREAKDOWN BY SECTOR (2019, %)

Interactive Chart Canada Natural Gas Domestic Consumption

More research: America LNG Trade Dataset

Coal Consumption

Coal and lignite consumption have been decreasing since 2011 by 5.5%/year, reaching 30 Mt in 2019. The power sector represents 81% of consumption.

Graph: : COAL CONSUMPTION (Mt)

Graph: : COAL CONSUMPTION BREAKDOWN BY SECTOR (2019, %)

Interactive Chart Canada Coal and Lignite Domestic Consumption

Power Consumption

Electricity consumption increased by about 2%/year since 2015 and reached 543 TWh in 2019.

Industry is the largest electricity consumer, followed by the residential and services sectors.

Graph: : ELECTRICITY CONSUMPTION (TWh)

Graph: : ELECTRICITY CONSUMPTION BREAKDOWN BY SECTOR (2019, %)

Renewable in % Electricity Production

In Ontario, a bill on renewables (Green Energy and Green Economy Act) introduced feed-in tariffs (FiTs) in 2009. In 2016, the government launched its 2nd Large Renewable Procurement (LRP II), expecting to save C$3.3bn by replacing the FiTs scheme with a competitive process for 930 MW in total (600 MW wind, 330 MW solar, small hydro and bioenergy). However, half of the contracts, corresponding to 440 MW, were cancelled in 2018. Ontario is committed to increasing the capacity of renewables to 20 GW by 2025.

Interactive Chart Canada Share of Renewables in Electricity Production (incl hydro)

CO2 Fuel Combustion/CO2 Emissions

GHG emissions reached 729 MtCO2eq (excluding LULUCF) in 2018 according to the national inventory. This is 2% below 2005 levels. Since 2013, emissions are relatively stable (around 700-730 MtCO2eq).

The country submitted its NDC (Nationally Determined Contribution) in 2015, announcing a GHG reduction target of 30% in 2030 compared to 2005 levels. Compared to 1990 emission levels, the NDC target implies significant additional abatement policies. The fastest growing source of emissions in Canada is the exploitation of oil sands.

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